Still enjoying garden, 5 weeks out….

Five weeks on the road, and we are still eating food from our garden. In the fall we harvested, canned, dried and froze a lot of food to take along on this trip.  We had over a hundred heirloom tomato plants so after the farmers market ended, we started drying and canning the tomatoes.

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We made roasted heirloom tomato sauce which we have brought about 30 pints.

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Also apple, green tomato chutney x 12 jars (great on rice, easy dinner).  We dried tomatoes as well and put them in oil in a jar for putting on pizzas and stir fries.

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We put the dried tomatoes into olive oil to reconstitute them and keep them in the fridge then.

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We also brought several winter squash, spaghetti and delicata.

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Ken was adamant this year that we were not going to waste any fruit, so took on the huge task of peeling, coring and slicing (we have a gadget that does this), and drying all of the apples, pears, peaches and we even dried raspberries.(and some grapes)

We also have dried beans that we have grown called calypso beans.

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I also made 2 types of pesto and froze it, Basil, parsley (italian and curly)

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I did a lot of research last year about crossing borders and food and found that essentially preserved food is allowed. (not meat). Of course there are always border crossing workers who opt to write their own laws, as many of the Canadian citizens  with coloured skin were not allowed into the US with the recent border changes.

But last year we brought canned tomatoes etc   and were searched (as we often are being a motorhome) and all he was looking for was sheep or goat meat.

Why do this?  Well one this is cost, organic food is expensive especially produce, and having all of it at home for free. At home we also work hard at achieving the 100 mile diet. Eating foods that were grown within 100 miles is an environment choice. They say that the food in the grocery store has travelled further than the average person travels on vacation.  We also do this for political reasons, why buy food that is from half way around the world, when you can support local growers?

We also buy our own locally grown grains, such as rye and fife, and  grind them with a stone grinder.  Have ground a few large bins of flour for the trip, for the pizzas and breads along the way.

Then for fresh produce we have a map of all of the trader joe stores along the way and stop there once a week.

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We have a great system for composting, an IKEA rack attached to the wall, and we fill up biodegradable bags with compost and then bury them out in the desert. I am sure that some poor tomato plants will start growing in spring only to look around and say, WHAT AM I DOING HERE?… and then quickly die in the heat.

OH and we are growing mung beans to have for dinner once a week.

We are pretty conservative with our water, so head to a sani dump every 5 days to fill up and dump the tank, but usually we have 3/4 of a tank of water left, so we could likely last for a few weeks without more water etc..  The solar panels in the day are enough to run the LED lights and the furnace and other devices for the evening.

So we are pretty self sufficient.

And while we are traipsing around the desert we have our 3600 garlic planted and protected (back home) , hopefully our biggest garlic ever. (perhaps enough to fund next years trip)

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and DID I mention we are finding rocks, perhaps I need to write a blog one of these days to show all the rocks we have found once I figure out for sure what they all are.

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And them great sunsets just keep coming

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Much love to all and merry christmas.

 

Drive through red……

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It never ceases to amaze me the clever beer labels.  I always choose the beer with the funkiest labels.  🙂  Quite appropriate today, as I drove  through some teddybear cholla cacti and my poor tire suffered “the attack of the teddybear cholla”.  I hardly knew I had a flat tire until Ken HAD TO take the thorn out… and then the tire went down quickly. I also fell again damaging a few things on the bike so now it is in “KENS SHOP”, getting fixed…..

Lets see, we have spent a few days  at Burro creek area hiking 900 feet down a very steep bank that apparently cows manage to make it up, to search for some wonderful pink chalcedony that we remembered seeing last year.IMG_2398

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Fortunately there was water at the bottom, which is the first water we have seen on any of our hikes.

It was also the day of the election in Alabama, and I thought that perhaps this might have been what Alabama had to say to Trump.

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Then we went to Prescott, where we stayed in a campground to get all our laundry done and I managed to leave Kens clothes in the dryer…….  Then we went from Prescott to Jerome. I have seen the drive described on a motorcycle blog as “127 curves in 12 miles”. Now I can see that as being exhilarating on a Harley Davidson, but in a 35 foot motorhome… Well lets just say we are not going back for Kens Laundry.

Now Jerome is considered to be a vertical town (imagine the Popeye movie with no ocean). NOT a place for a motorhome. The town was a copper mining town and at one time, the 4th largest city in the Arizona territory. The town had its hayday in the 1920s, decline in the depression of the 1930s, and then a reincarnation in the WW2 times, then decline. The past 30 years have given the town a whole new direction with the tourist industry. My theory is that a town that is on a vertical cliff facing the grand Canyon (or at least that is what I think it is) is what truly attracts people. Of course none of my pictures will do it justice, …..

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In my defence, we WERE a little shaken by the trip there, but we both feel we would LOVE to go back to Jerome sometime and stay at a bed and breakfast, I am sure it would be impossible NOT to have the incredible view of the lovely canyon  from every window in Jerome.  (which MIGHT …..be the Grand Canyon).    There was apparently shopping there was well. They have a parking lot from the old mine, that they have a shuttle going back and forth to the town area, which on some level might seem ridiculous, but if you really see how steep this town is, makes sense.

We had planned to drive up a 9.7 mile road from Jerome to go searching for the “most beautiful agates in central Arizona”, but realized that our motorhome was not up to the journey and 9.7 x 2 was possibly too much for Tucker, … so we moved on.

So we are now in Carefree Arizona. We are having stir fry tonite from sprouts I have been growing in the motorhome, gardening on the road.

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First 3 days…

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6 days…. yum.

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Must love to all

Janet

 

 

Doggies in the desert and electric bikes

Enemy number one. This plant in the desert is ruining our days. It is called Teddybear cholla. Odd name for something that you cannot touch,  let alone HUG.IMG_2349

Pictured here are the plant and the offending little beasties that are likely their way to reproduce.

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If you get one stuck to your foot… when you try to pull it out, you will get another barb stuck in your finger.

What happens is that Tucker is walking along, gets one of these in his foot and immediately tries to get it out with his mouth, then he has it stuck in his mouth which is really bad, and he starts thrashing around, LOTS of drool. So then Ken and I swing into action, Ken with his leather mans tool pliers and me holding tucker still.

Hence the booties.

 

Short video of his first steps in booties…. He got better.

The first day with the booties, although he seemed to do well, he was exhausted for 2 days (only 3 year old dog). We figure that perhaps it was more draining because he does not have a good grip, without his claws being out, so he is working twice has hard to get the same distance.  We are now in search of booties with treads on them.  OH and we are also spending as much time looking for lost booties than we are for rocks 🙂  Stay tuned for what we find works. Tucker is back to normal after 2 days of sleeping.

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Last year we were limited as to the sites we could  get to because our motorhome is not exactly an all terrain vehicle, MORE OF A one terrain vehicle, pavement and VERY good gravel roads. (last year we did damage to the motorhome (TAJ)….. by going where we should not have gone )     So to solve this we though  through many possible options, like hauling another vehicle, but were not ready to do that. SO a friend suggested Electric bikes, and we said YES…..which we have recently purchased.

Two ways to describe electric bikes, one is like a small motorcycle that has an electric motor that you can pedal to save electricity.

The other way to describe them is they are a mountain bike  that has less gears and a pedal assist engine for you get bogged down in the sand.

Sorry no action shots….. just this one picture of one of the fat tire bikes

Last year we attempted to ride our bikes to some of these remote spots, but it was very tough riding through the sand, especially uphill…….. and with rocks.  So we have bought heavy duty mountain bikes with fat tires that can ride over very large rocks no problem. I am pretty much of a fraidy cat mountain biker and pretty much bail whenever i get into any scary situation. With this motor (and the HUGE TIRES), I just push the throttle and ZOOM over obstacles.  Ken is pretty amazed at the terrain I am riding in no problem.  I have only fallen twice and I have to admit that ONE TIME … was because I noticed a nice rock on the side and was not paying attention. (Paying attention is a bit important).

The other really cool thing about the bikes is that if you are a lousy biker like me and struggle to get started on an uphill with loose gravel, I just push on the throttle, and ZOOM.  Another important thing about the bikes is that they have VERY VERY good disc brakes.  We bought the bikes in Canada and the electric bike rebuild Kit in the US, and Ken put it all together.  Saved a lot of money by him doing this part himself, and also he knows all about the workings when things need to be adjusted.

I would have to say that the electric part was as important as the fat tire part to make these bikes perfect for driving in the desert.

I do not have many GB left on my plan, so only a few pictures this time

MUCH LOVE

JanetIMG_2333

 

Ghost town in Nevada….

We have been on the road for almost 3 weeks now. We have only paid for a campground 3 nights now.  They usually cost about 40-45 a night, so about 1300-1400 a month. I guess we avoid them partially because of the cost, partially because we are to the point that we do not need them, ( we are getting by just fine on our solar power,  our 100 gallon water tank, propane for the stove, and a generator when all else fails(rare) ), but mostly because of the gorgeous spots we get to camp…… and the wild life..

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Not a great shot, but there is a coyote there, and Tucker is barking like crazy about it.

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…. and the burros. Strong winds, and I just missed a few of them rolling around in the sand kicking up the dust.

We have had several days of strong winds, COLD winds.  It has been interesting having our son Josh taking geography this term, learning how weather systems form. It seems as though the dreadful winds we have been experiencing through West Nevada, is in effect a high pressure system associated with the Santa Ana winds that  fuel the fires in Southern California.  The western part of Nevada, into California is called the “great west basin” . Here is an excerpt I found in Wikipedia.

“The Santa Anas are katabatic winds—Greek for “flowing downhill”, arising in higher altitudes and blowing down towards sea level.[4] Santa Ana winds originate from high-pressure airmasses over the Great Basin and upper Mojave Desert. Any low-pressure area over the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of California, can change the stability of the Great Basin High, causing a pressure gradient that turns the synoptic scale winds southward down the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada and into the Southern California region.[5] Cool, dry air flows outward in a clockwise spiral from the high pressure center. This cool, dry airmass sweeps across the deserts of eastern California toward the coast, and encounters the towering Transverse Ranges, which separate coastal Southern California from the deserts. The airmass, flowing from high pressure in the Great Basin to a low pressure center off the coast, takes the path of least resistance by channeling through the mountain passes to the lower coastal elevations, as the low pressure area off the coast pulls the airmass offshore.”

So yesterday was the first day we have noted a lessening of the winds, and the news said also that the Santa Ana winds had decreased.  So perhaps they will cool down and we will warm up.

One of the places we explored was Rhyolite, a ghost town from the gold boom.  It was dreadfully windy there, so we thought if we climbed closer to the mountains we might get out of the wind….. and we did.

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If you look at the spot up near the V,  we got out of the wind there 🙂

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…and this is the view from there. The flat part is Death Valley, and California in the distance.

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The entire valley is riddled with mining shafts like this one.

Gold was discovered here in 1905, and in 2 years it was a town of 12,000 people. It had banks, newspapers, gambling halls (of course gambling halls, it is Nevada..) … and even an Opera house.  3 Railroads had lines built into Rhyolite, but by 1911 the ores had begun to play out. Too bad they did not have RVs back then…… they could have just moved on to the next bonanza 🙂 .

The one building that is still standing is oddly the Kelly’s bottle house, made entirely of bottles.

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I believe this was the school.

There was also “the panic of 1907”  which saw the stock markets fall 50%, so there was much less money to invest in mining, yet another factor in the demise of Rhyolite.  Interesting to read about Charles Schwab as a major investor in this.

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seeing the remains of this building I was wondering if the bars were to keep someone in (jail), or keep someone out (bank). Turns out it was the former.

And we can hardly have a day with out something going wrong with the motorhome, and this is what our motorhome looks like when the hood is up…. the engine is under the bed, and some spring dohicky broke off that keeps the engine from over revving or something like that. Ken managed to gerry rig it back to being hooked up again and all was good.

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and Tucker now has booties, now that we are into the cactus. So we do not have to use pliers to get the thorns out of his paws.

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Where we stayed last night………

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So that is where Ken and Tucker and I are now

Much love

 

 

 

Hunkered down in Tonopah.

We are currently HUNKERED down in Tonopah NV due to weather. Yesterday there were winds up to 50 mph, and last night it went down to -7 C (19.4F). So time to repair, reflect, and do laundry.

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We did do a bit of wandering, but it was VERY cold and as you can see a sand storm in the distance.

We bought this motorhome 2.5 years ago, a 1995 Sahara Safari, essentially for the price of the new diesel Cummings engine, (which had been installed 600 miles prior).  Essentially we got the rest of the motor home for free, ……..retrospectively, it would seem .. what it was worth 🙂

A few years ago, the roof was destroyed in a storm and cost 8000$ to replace.  We were fortunate that it happened in a storm in that insurance paid for it. Shortly after that, a major part went in the transmission that was going to cost about 6000 dollars, and so the guy at the place basically said that we might want to get rid of the motorhome.  Our thoughts were “how could we get rid of it , it has a new roof?”  (of course you KNOW  what a slippery slope this kind of story can be…. )…….  At which time Ken FINALLY remembered his password to get onto the Safari online forum, a group we endearingly call the “OLD FARTS FORUM”.  We were told about a guy who remakes these parts, so we got one sent up from Texas for 600  bucks, and we were on our way again.

I shall not bore you with all of the things we (KEN) has repaired, but suffice it to say that it is a LOT.  Point to be made here is :DO NOT BUY AN OLD MOTORHOME unless you have a “KEN” to keep it running.  The past 2.5 years has been an apprenticeship of sorts for Ken, and I feel confident that he could, at this point, open up his own Safari repair shop.  He is continually in contact with the old Farts learning how everything is supposed to work. The previous owners of our motorhome had made an incredible mess of all of the wiring, and “jimmie rigged a lot.   But then the weather is pretty hard on it too. Yesterday Ken had to take all the panelling off the door after the STRONG winds caught hold of it and tore some of the wiring.

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OH and Tucker is still remembering how much fun he had while we were in Eugene, waiting to get the brakes fixed.

Despite all of this we have LOTS of fun traveling in the motorhome, most days we can just open the door and head off into whatever desert we are exploring.

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Just outside Hawthorne Nevada which is  the worlds largest munitions dump.IMG_2210

Yesterdays rocks all cleaned and ready for the basement.

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This is the frost on the INSIDE of the single pane windows…………..

We WILL have to head further south today.

MUCH love…

Our first day back in Nevada desert…

We have spent our first night out in the desert. What a great day. We are just south of Fernley NV, and our rockhounding book suggested one area, which we did not immediately find, but still found lots of cool rocks, then we resorted to our gps and found more. My theory is that the guy that writes the book has a 4×4 and drives to all the spots, so that those of us who wander further find all the stuff no one else finds 🙂

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There is a joke in Canada that from the prairies you can watch your dog run away for days, well we can keep an eye on our motorhome for MILES.

It was down to -3 Celsius (26 Fahrenheit ) last night, and we were warm as toast. (it was 15 celsius  (59 Fahrenheit) in the day).  This was an issue last year, as we were afraid we would freeze up overnight without electricity. This year we have our solar panels charging up our (house) batteries during the day, so at night the batteries  run the furnace fan and the LED lights.(propane runs the furnace). So as long as we are conservative with our water, we can be pretty self sufficient for several days.

We are parked about half a mile off the highway, on BLM land.  We have a lovely view in every direction, sunrise , sunset and everything in between.

 

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We are also taking advantage of the sun during the day and charging all of our chargers.  We need to keep all our devices charged, IPAD for gps, maps and weather. Computer to write this…… etc.

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We are currently watching the weather it is supposed to drop down to -6 in 2 days and we are not wanting to try camping that low. SOOOO we must either go south or to a lower elevation then.

So we really are alone out here…. well except for the wild horses, which seem to be plentiful here…. there is horsepoop EVERYwhere.  A gardeners dream. I am sure if it ever rained here it would be a great place to grow things.

So we are warm and dry and have I mentioned that I LOVE THE NEW STOVE.IMG_2189

Hard to believe that it is almost 2 weeks since we left home. We had a brake problem that presented itself  at 4 pm on the day before thanksgiving. We found out black friday that there was nothing going to be open until Monday, and then Monday, no one had an appointment free. So we left Eugene Wednesday and now it is Friday. We have thus far had a pipe burst at the beginning, then a leak from the new roof, which Ken has fixed and then the brakes. So we figure things go in threes so we should be good for here on..

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Oh and there was this guy on a motorized glider who kept going by….

Much Love

Janet

 

first day on the road.

Do you ever worry when things are going too well?  Well I have had an uneasy week, that has been going FAR TOO WELL. Make no mistake, it has been an incredible week.

We have spent a month worrying as to whether weather would allow us to hit the road when we wanted to, having left it so late in the year. I managed to get out of my last shift at work, so we could head south today. Every year we have headed south, thus far, we have spent cleaning up water, with leaking roofs, leaking wheel wells, leaking toilets, burst pipes, and this year, Ken has obsessively made certain that EVERYTHING was going to work well. I was getting very uncomfortable with how things were going.. Just too good. SOMETHING had to go wrong.

Well everything was according to plan,  great weekend medical conference at sparkling hill resort in vernon.

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Made it home in time for one last dog walk with my friend

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, we hit the road to spend night at Dylan and Sarah’s (our son and daughter in law)in Kamloops. Great evening…..

Then it happened, we decided before we left kamloops to fill up our tanks with water. There was the usual filling noises, but then there was a different sort of filling noise that sounded more like a spray, and presto…. the motor home was once again rivets of water running down the floor.  Then soaking towels hanging all over the place and heaters trying to dry the floor. SAME OLD SAME OLD.  Turns out this obsolete ice maker in the motor home is still connected to the water, and  I guess the pipe must have broken when it got cold a few weeks ago.  It was great that we FOUND a problem, and Ken was able to fix it.

We both felt quite relieved that FINALLY something had gone wrong, and that it was fixable. So now our trip is back to usual and we can stop worrying about when the floods are to begin.

Ken has made so many changes to “taj” the motorhome this year, the biggest being installing a range stove/oven.  UP until now we have only had a 2 burner stove top, that worked very poorly. NO OVEN.

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So Ken has taken out 3 drawers, moved them into one of the closets,….IMG_0748

and installed this wonderful stove. We have decided we are going to try to make bread every day.

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We buy our own grains locally, and have our own stone grinder, and have ground up several containers of local grain flour for over the winter. So we needed an oven.  We have this book teaching how to make a daily loaf of bread, in 5 minutes, so we will let you know how that goes.

We are now south of the border, and though we have lots of fruits and veggies we have preserved, we technically do not have any fruits or vegetables, which  from the research I have done is fine crossing borders. Preserved foods do not spread diseases.

Much love

Janet…. and Ken and Tucker

Living off the land….on the road.

Living off the land…. on the road.

I am going to write this year about our upcoming adventure to points south of here in our motorhome. In  particular I am hoping to write about how we are taking our garden with us, in many delicious ways.

As we are coming to terms with the first snowfall, and the first plunge into freezing temperatures, we are wishing we might have been somewhere very far south by this time…… but we are not.  We will be soon though.

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DREARY isn’t it?

We arrived home from last  years adventures (that I wrote about here) on January 4th 2017. It was an abrupt transition from 3 wonderful months of exploring, and rock hounding, that ended with a letter from CRA, Canada Revenue Agency. They were auditing us for our 2014 year which was the last one we actually had an office practice, so it was a big deal. After years of running  our doctors office, we had gotten a bit slack on record keeping and downright lazy on keeping receipts.

So we opted to take on this audit with the same energy that we put into everything, and sat here for an entire month, reconstructing 2014 and tracking down receipts. Did you know that there are a lot of things that they do NOT give you receipts for?  Well by the time May came, it appeared that the CRA actually would be owing us money, so they quietly said that they would not change our tax return…… and we just left it at that….no point in pushing our luck.  One thing about the CRA (and I am sure the IRS) …. when they say they do not accept credit card bills or check stubs….. THEY MEAN IT!

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WE ALSO TOOK THIS TIME TO START 800 Heirloom tomato plants……

Not sure when exactly it happened, but somewhere along the way, last winter, I decided that I had worked TOO DAMMED hard to become a doctor to let it gojust yet. So I DID go back to work this past year.  I was not totally sure what I wanted to do to begin with, but after being audited it was clear I did not want to have my own clinic.  Primary care is going through major changes now based on the shortage of primary care doctors, and so I have found my self with several options that do not involve clinic.  After some trials, I am now working at a very new concept rapid access breast health clinic.  We get referrals from the screening mammogram program.  It is a very cool program in that a person who has a concerning mammogram in the screening program,  gets seen, reviewed, breast exam done and biopsy done all in the same day.  As a cancer surviver myself, I have often credited the doctor whom offered me a biopsy the first day I saw her. …….. with my timely diagnosis. (mine was not breast cancer)

I am also doing work in Long Term Care facilities, as a director and I cover for other doctors when they are away. MUST protect my winter  time off.

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OH and we also bought an electric car, because where I work is 90 Km away from where we live and could not come to terms with all of the fuel I would burn through driving all this way to work  2-3 times a week.

 

SOOOO Back to the living off the land part.

We have a (sort of) Market garden. We grow vegetables and sell them at the market, and some day we hope to make money at this. We totally benefit from this in that it feeds us. We EAT VERY WELL.

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So we have squirrelled away our harvest, and this year are hoping to live off the land, on the road.

My last day of work at the breast clinic is November 22nd, and we plan to leave after I get off work.  Currently we are studying 14 day weather forecasts hoping for a no snow no ice day for November 22nd.

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So I am hoping to talk about our adventures as well as how we grew, harvested and preserved the fruit and vegetables that we are bring along with us for the winter, as well as how I cooked them perhaps.  Right now we are excited to get away, but still have lots to do before we leave.

So follow along our trip if you find it interesting, but do not feel obliged…. I just like to write.  MUCH LOVE Janet

A life in a day….

We have been camping out in the desert for about 6 weeks now, a few nights in campgrounds and a few nights with friends outside of Phoenix. It really is the most laid back trip we have ever had. We have been back and forth across the border of California and Arizona a lot and have been near the border a lot. So rather than change our clocks over and over, we just decided to pick a time zone and stick with it.  We like Arizona time.

Our motorhome is showing some signs of abuse, with us trying to get to places we likely should not get into.  I love to see the smirks on peoples faces as they drive by us in their 4×4 vehicles, out in the middle of nowhere. We can usually see civilization from where we camp, but are usually 2-3 miles or more away from it. Tonite I can see the highway and trains 2 miles from here.  Deserts are like that.

We found that the campgrounds usually had very poor internet, so are relying on our AT&T cards. We have found that it is a pretty good deal, 10$ for a GB.  We can buy the refill cards in the grocery stores. We are not streaming anything (and have turned off automatic stream) and are able to work on the blog, check email, news, and although these days we are trying to avoid it, Facebook. 🙂  So it is costing us 40-50 dollars a month for internet.  We fill up water and dump sani at stations after every 4-5 days out.  Our only issue is garbage, which we have very little of…..  We use all cardboard boxes to fill with rocks, 🙂   not really but some.  We bury all out compost out in the desert.

We often stay at the same places a few days and cover on average 60 miles every few days driving. We walk between 3-5 miles a day looking for rocks, and some days biking (one day we biked 17 miles, half up hill in sand. was not part of the plan)

When we get back we set up our table scrub off our rocks to find which ones are keepers and which ones are not.  We smash some to make sure.  🙂   We now have several reference books to help us ID stuff.

We have wine, stoned wheat thins, and watch the sun sets. (or suns set)    We have wonderful gourmet dinners, and some days leftovers of gourmet dinners.  Then we play crib. Ken usually beats me, but last night we tried out a different deck of cards and I started winning.   Nice days. OH and reading lots of books.

These are Chalcedony Roses.  Essentially the same stuff that make up Agates, with out the lines (bands) . We have some pink ones and some white as well…..They will tumble up beautifully, when we get back to our tumbler.

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This is a geode. We see them everywhere here.  We have yet to find an unopened one though we have smashed a lot of ordinary rocks to see if there were geodes.

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This is a rockhound.img_1506

This is an agate with some opal in it, with part of a geode???

img_1514This is jasper/agate that has formed within a seam (the space between two rocks layers).  I should add that these are my interpretations

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larger chalcedony rose wth an agate geode.

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This is an agate geode with some amethyst ? centrally, and some copper minerals around the edges??

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I am not totally sure what this is, but every piece of it looked like hunks of wood, but they were completely very fragile crystals.

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I know this looks like a hunk of rotten beef… it is rather complex and will take cutting etc to bring out the full beauty.  I am hoping my friend the gemologist will add to this and I will edit this then.

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This is an amethyst geode with some…?opal, chrysocolla  around it.

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We think that this is a jasper/agate with central brown jasper and some opal around the edges.

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an agate.

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Well it is 7:30, ARIZONA time…….

Through the desert in a house with no name

We have definitely stayed at some extremely cool spots thus far. I have been trying to take pictures of each of the places.

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This was actually in a park, but no services, Valley of fire state park. wonderful red rock formations. Indian writing on wall. Just outside of Vegas.img_1779

This was next to where we had camped. WAY up a road in Nevada where a blue quartz mine was. We walked all the way up to the mine and looked all over to find that we really did not LIKE blue quartz. Funny how that works, but the view was worth the climb.

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This was on the ROUTE 66, a very old little shop called Cold springs. We camped further out in the desert the night before, but the lady who ran the shop told us to stay there the next night, as the guy who usually did security was gone.  Really a cool little museum. Here is link for more info http://azrt66.com/cool-springs/

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To get any further on this road to Oatman was too risky for a long vehicle, so we stayed at cool springs.

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We have to date managed 5 days  in a row with no services, and have found that if you google RV dumps, you can find places where you just pay a fee of 10-20 bucks to sani dump and add fresh water.

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Not all days have been totally perfect. Days like yesterday, the rockhounding book said that the “area” was 10.3 miles down a dirt road, and that all vehicles could make it. Said that there were soft areas, but that you should just keep moving. Well we have some to learn that “all vehicles” does not necessarily mean a 35 foot Motorhome.  There are a few questions that go through our minds as we move one down these roads. One is….. I wonder if there will be a place to turn this rig around?  Another is “I wonder if the AAA has limits to where they will go to haul out a motorhome?    yet another question we wondered a few days ago was…. ” I wonder if Chains would work as well in sand as they do in snow”

WE are not at all sure if we are being as kind to our motorhome as it has been to us . After the bind we got into yesterday, we have vowed that we WILL Look closer on Google earth.dsc_0737

This was just outside Parker Arizona, … actually closer to Earp California.  Not the greatest picture, but definitely a spot we will go back to.  6 miles from town and sitting above looking out a mountains all around.

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also one of the most dramatic sunsets I believe I have ever seen. Oh and sunrise as well.

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We are now on the California side of Lake Havasu.  Total wilderness, looking across the lake at a large city.  After my last blog several people encouraged us NOT to head home too soon, as it is much colder.  We WILL however slowly wind our way north now, and hope for better weather for those north of us.